CONTRIBUTED BY QUENTIN RICHARDSON

Snorkeling Area
Snorkeling Area

Snorkeling this area is very rewarding if you use your best judgement. There is plenty of areas to see squid, eels and a variety of fish. There are areas like this all over the island, but on this particular day when the water was calm, we decided to give it a try. Only enter this area when the sea condition is clear.

Snorkeling Hole
Snorkeling Hole

The beach itself is very shallow and goes out about 75 to 100 feet. At its edge is where the coral begins as canyons that fall 10 to 60 feet below sea level. Some are wide enough to swim in, but make sure you have an exit strategy before jumping in. These canyons offer the easy way into the open sea. We decided to try one out before heading into the deeper, more open waters. Around us, were schools of fish and squid feeding off the coral. Eels are interlaced between the holes of the canyons, so be mindful of their presence.

Snorkeling Sea Life
Snorkeling Sea Life

After venturing out a bit more we reached the open ocean where schools of hundreds of fish dart past you. The larger fish are seen swimming under you and the bottom is now at least 150 feet below you but very easy to see. We swam up to the tip of Cape Hedo and turned back, since usually we see sea turtles in that area.

Snorkelers
Snorkelers

Be mindful of the changes the ocean presents, coming backing in we had to battle waves since the tides had rolled back in. Do not go in if there are waves. Again, approach this area when the water is calm.

Snorkeling Views
Snorkeling Views

Directions:  Drive north on Highway 58 to Cape Hedo. Make the left turn at the intersection for Cape Hedo. Take the first right at the 3-way intersection and follow the road down the hill. Go in between the cemeteries and the entrance to the beach is on the left. Do not drive on the beach unless you vehicle has all wheel drive! Don’t get stuck in the sand like I did.

1 COMMENT

  1. I would add that this area is an advanced snorkeling area and should be done if you’re very comfortable in the water and able to swim long distance. It’s best done when the winds are coming from the South or West. The coral reef edge is about 100-200 yards from shore, so if you dive during high tide, you’ll have to swim that far to get to any depth. The easiest time to tackle this area is on an outgoing tide right before low tide during a new moon or full moon. You can literally walk up to the edge of the coral reef, as depicted by the photos. You want to be out of the water before high tide or outgoing tide. Be careful, the East end of the beach has huge wave breaks so it’s better to enter/exit further North/West.

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